SAGITTARIUS LITERATURE DIGITIZING PROJECTS

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African Canadian
Literature Project

Welcome to African Canadian Literature curriculum for schools. This curriculum includes a selection of TEXTS, SUPPORTING MATERIALS, and ideas for LESSONS and ACTIVITIES. All are welcome; however, some of the materials presented are COPYRIGHT RESTRICTED, and so are available only to SCHOOL BOARDS THAT SUBSCRIBE to the ORION Network. Non subscribers will not be able to view materials in the library.
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Bernard Shaw
Project

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All materials are open access, except some copyright restricted materials which can be accessed here. These copyright restricted materials are available only to school boards that subscribe to the ORION Network in Canada.

NEW LINKS:
*VIRTUAL TOUR OF SHAW’S CORNER, NARRATED BY PROFESSOR STANLEY WEINTRAUB

* Weintraub, Stanley. Bernard Shaw: A Guide to Research University Park, Pa. : Pennsylvania State University Press, 1992. We would like to thank Professor Stanley Weintraub for allowing SAGITTARIUS to include this work.

*Feature Article: “Who is Bernard Shaw?” by Stanley Weintraub and Rodelle Weintraub

George Bernard Shaw (he never used George as an adult) was born in Dublin on July 26, 1856. His formal schooling ended at fourteen, when he became a clerk and bookkeeper at an estate agency. He abhorred the stultifying work, and when his mother and father separated in 1876, and “Bessie” Shaw emigrated to London, young Shaw followed. Unable at first to find employment, he went to work for the Bell Telephone Company of London, explaining frankly that it was a temporary resort, as he wanted to make his living at literature. He left after six months, having begun a novel, Immaturity, in his informal university, the domed Reading Room of the British Museum. He had begun spending hours at a desk there while living frugally off his mother’s earnings as a music teacher. (Chronically impecunious, he became a vegetarian, only in part because of ethical sensitivities.) A few pounds writing, and ghost-writing, music, book and drama criticism kept his writing ambitions alive while he completed four additional novels rejected in turn by trade publishers as too unconventional for Victorian audiences.

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Digitizing literary resources for Canada’s students